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Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Geek Trivia: Which Game Featured A Massive Easter Egg That Originated As A Player Rumor?

Which Game Featured A Massive Easter Egg That Originated As A Player Rumor?

  1. Splinter Cell
  2. Black & White II
  3. Halo 4
  4. Diablo II

Think you know the answer?



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Monday, March 18, 2019

How to Hide Spelling and Grammar Errors in a Specific Word Document

word logo

If you want to hide spelling and grammar errors in a specific Word document without all of your other documents being affected by the setting change, then you’re in luck. Microsoft Word, unsurprisingly, has a way to do this.

You might be wondering why you’d want to turn off spellcheck for a specific document in the first place. There is any number of reasons. Perhaps you like leaving the feature on in most documents but have one where it distracts you. Or, perhaps you’ve got a boilerplate where you use filler words (like Word’s Lorem Ipsum feature). Or, maybe you want to test yourself and see how many mistakes you make. Whatever the reason, you can do it in a few simple steps.

Hiding Document-Specific Spelling and Grammar Mistakes

With your document open, switch to the “File” tab.

file tab

Next, select “Options” from the bottom of the left-hand pane.

select options

The “Word Options” window will now appear. Here, select the “Proofing” tab.

proofing tab

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Fitbit Charge 3 Review: a Good Fitness Tracker in an Awkward Price Range

Daily News Roundup: New iPads, Window Defender for Chrome, and More Android Stuff

A lot happened over the weekend, but the biggest news to start your March 18th, 2019 morning came from Apple with a couple of new iPads. Otherwise, Microsoft released Defender extensions for Chrome and Firefox, and a lot more.

Apple News

Apple doesn’t generally, you know, do a lot when it comes to announcements and all that—it’s far less busy than, say, Google, for example. But when something hits the scene, it’s always big news.

  • New iPads! Apple announced a new iPad Mini with modern specs and Pencil (1st gen) support, as well as an updated iPad Air with a 10.5-inch screen. [Review Geek]

Microsoft and Windows News

Microsoft was pretty quiet over the weekend, but it subtly “announced” a new extension to help keep Chrome and Firefox users safer.

  • Microsoft is working on a Windows Defender extension for Chrome and Firefox. It’s similar to Defender integration in Edge, just for browsers you might actually want to use. [Windows Blog]

Google and Android News

As always, a lot has already happened with Google since Friday. With the recent release of the Android Q beta for Pixel devices, new features are pretty constant right now.

  • You’ll soon be able to disallow access to motion and light sensors for specific sites in Chrome. It’s being tested in Canary right now, but we should see it in Stable builds later this year. [Techdows]
  • Chrome OS 73 is improved transitions to and from tablet mode on the Slate and other 2-in-1 Chromebooks. [About Chromebooks]
  • There’s a hidden setting in Pixel Launcher on Android Q that hints at better gesture navigation. Please, Google. Please. [XDA Developers]
  • Speaking of hidden settings in Q, there’s another option to remap the Squeeze for Assistant features on the Pixel 2 and 3. [Android Police]
  • New Google Play requirements are going to require all icons to be rounded rectangles moving forward. Some people call them squircles, but I think there’s a slight difference between the two. Anyway, rounded-corner-square-thingies are coming soon to an icon near you. [XDA Developers]
  • Samsung announced an event to announce a new phone. Or phones. New Galaxy A handsets are incoming. [Samsung Mobile Press]
  • Like Facebook Chatheads? Android Q might get them everywhere. [9to5Google]
  • AV-Comparatives compared 250 different Android antivirus apps. Turns out most of the suck and don’t do what they’re supposed to do. Who knew? [AV-Comparatives]
  • ZTE may be making an all-screen phone with a slideout camera. It looks nice. [Engadget]
  • Google could be working an Android fork for feature phones. Intriguing. [9to5Google]
  • Xioami subsidiary Black Shark announced a new gaming phone with a Snapdragon 855 and 12GB of RAM. It looks like of neat, too. [Liliputing]

Other News

You know, the other stuff.

  • Plantronics is rebranding as Poly to bring some buzz back to its product line. A bunch of new stuff is in the works, too. [Engadget]


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Daily Deals: iPad Pro for $750, Cheap Desktop Accessories, Discounted Games, and More

Apple Announces Updated iPad Air and New iPad Mini

How to Change the Default Search Engine in Safari on iPhone or iPad

Google search

Safari uses Google as its default search engine out of the box, but it’s not the only option. You can choose other search engines like Bing, Yahoo, or DuckDuckGo if you prefer them.

While most modern search engines can find the web sites you’re looking for, there are often ramifications to consider when making your selection. Google is the big player here, but depending on your privacy stance you might want to select something else. For example, DuckDuckGo pushes itself as a more private search engine, while Bing is integrated with Microsoft Rewards. Making the change in Safari on your iPhone or iPad is super simple, so long as you know where to look.

Changing the Default Search Engine in Safari on iPhone and iPad

To get started, open the Settings app and tap “Safari.”

Open Settings. Tap Safari

Next, under the “Search” heading, tap “Search Engine.”

Tap Search Engine

Finally, select the search engine that you would like to use as your default when inside Safari. To select a search engine, tap it. You can choose either Google, Yahoo, Bing, or DuckDuckGo.

Sorry—those are the only options. Apple won’t let you choose other search engines as your default. You can still navigate to those search engines in Safari and search them from their website, but that’s it. The only way you’ll get more options here is if Apple adds them in a future version of the iOS operating system.

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How to Use an MMO or MOBA Mouse For Productivity

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How to Enable Remaining Battery Time in Windows 10

Battery Time Remaining Desktop View

Windows 10 no longer shows the estimated battery time remaining after the Creators Update. You’ll just see a percentage when you hover over the battery icon—not a time. Although it has its quirks, you still might want to see it.

Why Did Microsoft Hide the Battery Life Estimate?

This information was removed because it’s just an estimate. It can change dramatically depending on what processes are running, how bright your screen is, and whether you’re connected to Wi-Fi or Bluetooth. Your computer is making an informed guess and displaying an estimated battery life in real-time. It can fluctuate wildly, and Microsoft seems to think it’s no longer useful.

Apple recently made the same decision on macOS, too. By default, both macOS and Windows just show the percent of your laptop’s battery you have left with no guess about how long it will last.

Battery status without time remaining

RELATED: Why Is My Battery Estimate Never Accurate?

How to Bring Back Battery Time Remaining

To bring back the battery time remaining in Windows 10, you just need to make a few edits in the Windows Registry.

Standard Warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool and misusing it can render your system unstable or even inoperable. This is a pretty simple hack, and as long as you stick to the instructions, you shouldn’t have any problems. That said, if you’ve never worked with it before, consider reading about how to use the Registry Editor before you get started. And definitely back up the Registry (and your computer!) before making changes.

Open the Registry Editor by hitting Start and typing “ regedit .” Press Enter to open the Registry Editor and then permit it to make changes to your PC.

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